The Importance of Warm Up and Cool Down for Athletes

Posted by Megan Fischer-Colbrie on Jul 24, 2017 10:14:00 AM

Going through a complete warm up and cool down before and after competitions and training sessions is a simple way for athletes to maximize their athletic performance. Even though it takes just an extra few minutes, it is easy for athletes to fall into the habit of not warming up or cooling down. Pre and post workout exercises play a crucial role in preparing the body for activity and assisting in full recovery.

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Topics: S+C, Recovery

Hormonal Response to Strength Training

Posted by BridgeAthletic on Jul 24, 2017 10:00:00 AM

Strength training causes a series of physical changes to the body. It’s easy to notice external changes like increases in muscle tone and mass; however, it is less obvious to see hormonal responses and changes within the body. Athletes and coaches should understand the effects of hormones in order to design an effective strength training program to maximize performance.

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Topics: S+C, Training

Neural Adaptations and Strength Training

Posted by BridgeAthletic on Jul 24, 2017 9:00:00 AM

Strength training develops motor neuron pathways that enhance an athlete's brain-body coordination during functional movements. The “neural adaptations” athletes undergo in training refers to the brain’s ability to recruit muscles to contract and produce a particular movement. Practicing an exercise with resistance teaches an athlete's brain to fire the correct muscles to achieve a desired motion. Over time, the athlete’s technique to the exercise becomes ingrained and the movement becomes more automatic.

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Topics: S+C, Training

Pull-up Progression to Improve Strength to Weight Ratio

Posted by Megan Fischer-Colbrie on Jul 21, 2017 3:00:00 PM

Strength to weight ratio is an important concept for all athletes to keep in mind. In sports that place high value on both endurance and speed, such as swimming and running, the strength to bodyweight ratio is a good measure of overall athletic efficiency. In gymnastics, strength to bodyweight ratio is incredibly critical to an athletes ability to suspend themselves throughout various positions. In general, a high strength to weight ratio is favorable. To develop strength without gaining excessive body mass, bodyweight exercises are the way to go about doing so. These movements will increase an athlete's functional strength: strength that utilizes the whole body rather than isolating parts of it. Most strength programs will have a combination of bodyweight and regular weighted exercises to achieve various strength goals. To delve into this topic further, one extremely valuable bodyweight exercise: the pull-up.

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Topics: S+C

Is it Best to Strength Train Before or After Practice?

Posted by Megan Fischer-Colbrie on Jul 21, 2017 9:37:00 AM

Many athletes and coaches wonder whether strength training produces better results when performed before or after practice. In many sports, practice is the cardiovascular portion of a workout, and combining cardio with strength training in one session can be extremely taxing to the body. Importantly, there is little scientific research to date favoring one method over the other, but read more to learn about both theories in context.

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Topics: S+C, Recovery

Designing a Strength Program: Importance of Core Stability

Posted by BridgeAthletic on Jul 19, 2017 10:00:00 AM

Whether it’s kicking, throwing, running, jumping or swimming, an athlete’s core is involved in almost every action. Core muscles are responsible for stabilizing the spine and pelvis as well as generating and transferring energy from the center of the body to its extremities. Developing core strength and stability enables athletes to maximize their power output and perform complex athletic movements that require coordination, balance, and technical skills. Additionally, focusing on core strength can help athletes stabilize other weak areas to reduce the risk of injury. When designing a strength program, coaches should implement core exercises in order to optimize athletic performance.

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Topics: S+C, Training

Designing a Strength Program: Importance of Sports Periodization

Posted by Megan Fischer-Colbrie on Jul 19, 2017 9:20:00 AM

Sports periodization is the planning of athletic training using a progressively cyclic format with the goal of timing peak performance during the athlete’s major competitive events. Cyclic training organizes a team's approach, protects against overtraining, and enables athletes to continue to improve. When designing a strength program, coaches should implement different training cycles in order to maximize athlete performance when they need it most.

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Topics: S+C, Training

Designing a Strength Program: Importance of Hip Mobility

Posted by BridgeAthletic on Jul 19, 2017 8:00:00 AM

Hip mobility is very important for all athletes, especially for players that spend a significant amount of time sitting when they aren’t training or competing. Whether athletes are working 8-hour days at a desk, or spending hours in the classroom, sitting shortens the hip-flexors and weakens the glute muscles which negatively impacts hip mobility and player performance. It is important for coaches to design a strength program that includes hip mobility exercises and stretches in order to offset tight muscles from hours of sitting. 

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Topics: S+C, Training

Stretching Improves Athletic Performance and Health

Posted by Megan Fischer-Colbrie on Jul 18, 2017 11:17:00 AM


Stretching can improve circulation, muscle flexibility, range of motion, and consequently, help athletes perform better in workouts and in competition. When exercising, muscles repeatedly flex and contract. Stretching causes muscles to lengthen and relax, resulting in the ability to maximize muscle engagement in the next workout. Stretching also boosts the body’s circulation by increasing blood flow throughout the body.

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Topics: S+C, Recovery

 

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